List of the 5 Best Study Abroad Programs

By | October 27, 2016

List of the 5 Best Study Abroad Programs. The world is an open door, and college students are standing on the threshold. Never before have there been more international opportunities for college students; potential employers see international experience as a qualification in hiring college graduates. Not only is studying abroad beneficial to one’s resume, traveling broadens the mind, grows compassion, and allows the person to see the world through a new lens.

With the vast expanse of study abroad programs available at almost every university, here at Best College Reviews we compiled a list of some of the most desirable study abroad opportunities. We found that most universities offer study abroad programs through third-party organizations, or they provide enrollment at a partner university in a foreign country, but our list contains programs unique to the university, and provide a personal experience for the student. Our list was chosen based on the following criteria:

  • The program is open to a limited number of students, 500 or less, providing a more intimate experience while abroad.
  • The program is at least a semester long.
  • Faculty from the university are involved with the students internationally, either traveling with the students, teaching abroad, or overseeing the program in the country.
  • The university has a specific location internationally, students are not simply enrolling at international universities.

1. University of Evansville

University of Evansville

University of Evansville

Saturday Morning, the rain holding off long enough for volunteers to help returning and new students move in to the residence halls at the University of Evansville.

The University President even pitching in, delivering refreshments to kids and parents lugging in all the dorm room essentials.

The welcome event happens each year and there are roughly 540 new students this year. Tom Kazee says, “It’s a chance for us to meet the families as they come in and sort of help the adjustment that happens whenever a new family arrives to deposit their son or daughter at the University.”

Students starting this year say they like the class sizes offered at the University of Evansville and the close-nit feeling they have on campus. They say they are eager to learn and excited to make new memories.

2. Guilford College

Guilford College

Guilford College

Guilford College is the only Quaker-founded college in the southeastern United States. Opening in 1837 as New Garden Boarding School, the institution became a four-year liberal arts college in 1888. Levi Coffin, a well-known abolitionist, Quaker, and political dissenter grew up on the land, which is now considered a historical site. The woods of New Garden, which still exist on campus today, were used as a meeting point for the Underground Railroad in the 19th century, run by Coffin.

3. Emerson College

Emerson College

Emerson College

Charles Wesley Emerson founded the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory, and Dramatic Art in 1880, a year after Boston University closed its School of Oratory. Classes were held at Pemberton Square in Boston. Ten students enrolled in the conservatory’s first class. The following year, the conservatory changed its name to the “Monroe Conservatory of Oratory,” in honor of Charles Emerson’s teacher at Boston University’s School of Oratory, Professor Lewis B. Monroe. In 1890, the name changed again to “Emerson College of Oratory” and was later shortened to Emerson College in 1939.

4. Goshen College

Goshen College

Goshen College

Goshen College is a private liberal arts college in Goshen, Indiana. The institution was founded in 1894 as the Elkhart Institute of Science, Industry and the Arts, and is affiliated with Mennonite Church USA. The college is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. U.S. News and World Reports ranks Goshen as a third-tier national liberal arts college.

Goshen has an enrollment of around 775 students. While Goshen maintains a distinctive liberal Mennonite worldview, it admits students of all religions. Its percentage of Mennonite students to other religious affiliations is 43/57.

Goshen College is home to The Mennonite Quarterly Review and the Mennonite Historical Library, a 75,000 volume library compiling the most comprehensive collection of Anabaptist Mennonite primary source material in the United States.

5. Millsaps College

Millsaps College

Millsaps College

It isn’t every college that owns a 4,500 acre Biocultural Reserve in the heart of the Yucatan peninsula. While abroad in the Yucatan, students may take courses in archaeology, business, ecology, education, geology, history, literature, and social-cultural anthropology. The Reserve consists of an off-the-grid Research and Learning Center, a laboratory and research facility in the nearby town of Oxkutzcab, and a dormitory-classroom facility. Students may come back for multiple semesters and conduct research at the facility and continue to take classes. The unique setting and offerings at Millsaps make it a one-of-a-kind opportunity.

Kitchen Scramble CETrainer Free Download
Kitchen Scramble CETrainer Free Download
10 KB Version: 105 CETRAINER

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *